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[Slavenka Drakulić] E-pub Kao da me nema free



10 thoughts on “Kao da me nema

  1. says:

    Croatian journalist novelist and essayist Slavenka Drakulić has written a terrifyingly fierce and painful novel of a country's lost identity told through the suffering of a nameless group of female inmates in a camp and their difficult attempts to rebuild their lives after liberation All the characters are simply known by

  2. says:

    This was the first Drakulic I read and at the time I felt incapable of writing a review although I consider it both very well written as a novel and immensely important as a historical reflection on the routine of rape during wars There was a double reason why I could not put into words what I thought First of al

  3. says:

    I don’t know why I have read this book at this very time close to Christmas it is a devastating book and it is

  4. says:

    When your country is at war with another or perhaps many others you are aware of the risk to human life You know soldiers will die you know that some of these may be people you know or even your loved ones But though the c

  5. says:

    Slavenka Drakulic born 1949 is a Croatian novelist sociologist and a journalist who writes mainly on women issues This is my opening sentence because when I picked up this book I asked myself Drakulic who? and thought that this was a horror

  6. says:

    My original review 2000 in the San Francisco ChronicleS A Novel of the Balkans By Slavenka Drakulic Viking; 216 pages; 2295Croatian writer Slavenka Drakulic has given the world a gift digging into the twisted reality of the war that splintered the former Yugoslavia and emerging with ``S'' a searing story about a woman held in a Bosnian concentration camp It is a haunting difficult novel that is also somehow redemptiveIn the past

  7. says:

    Is it good to remember or is it easier to survive if you forget you ever lived a normal life?Croatian journalist Slavenka Drakulic wro

  8. says:

    A must read bookIt reminded me of movies such as Incendies Beanpole and Aurora Borealis Their murderers need to forget but their victims must not let them

  9. says:

    Perhaps that happens to people in wartime words suddenly become superfluous because they can no longer express reality Reality escapes the words we know and we simply lack new words to encapsulate this new experience Only now does S understand that a woman's body never really belongs to the woman It belongs to others—to the man the children the family And in wartime to soldiers Now however she sees that for her war began the moment othe

  10. says:

    this novel concerns the systematized rape and torture of civilian bosnian women during the conflicts in the balkans during the early nineties it's deeply troubling stuff almost a psychosexual counterpart to a day in the life of ivan denisovich which begs the inevitable uestion why am i reading this? certainly there's an impulse to somehow

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SUMMARY ä DEALSONWINES.CO.UK ↠ Slavenka Drakulić

Set in 1992 during the height of the Bosnian war S reveals one of the most horrifying aspects of any war the rape and torture of civilian women by occupying forces S is the story of a Bosnian woman in exile who has just given birth to an unwanted child one wi. Croatian journalist novelist and essayist Slavenka Drakuli has written a terrifyingly fierce and painful novel of a country s lost identity told through the suffering of a nameless group of female inmates in a camp and their difficult attempts to rebuild their lives after liberation All the characters are simply known by a single initial with the main focal point being a woman called S She has just given birth in a Stockholm hospital to a child she wants nothing to do with after being repeatedly raped whilst bei

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Kao da me nema

Ured and in telling her story timely strangely compelling and ultimately about survival depicts the darkest side of human nature during wartime S may very well be one of the strongest books about war you will ever read The writing is taut precise and masterfu. Perhaps that happens to people in wartime words suddenly become superfluous because they can no longer express reality Reality escapes the words we know and we simply lack new words to encapsulate this new experience Only now does S understand that a woman s body never really belongs to the woman It belongs to others to the man the children the family And in wartime to soldiers Now however she sees that for her war began the moment others started dividing and labelling her when nobody asked her anything any In

SUMMARY ä DEALSONWINES.CO.UK ↠ Slavenka Drakulić

Thout a country a name a father or a language Its birth only reminds her of an even grueling experience being repeatedly raped by Serbian soldiers in the women's room of a prison camp Through a series of flashbacks S relives the unspeakable crimes she has end. When your country is at war with another or perhaps many others you are aware of the risk to human life You know soldiers will die you know that some of these may be people you know or even your loved ones But though the civilians at home worry about those who are away fighting for their country they rarely see themselves as part of the war The threat to them seems far away almost unreal So when the occupying forces marched into the Bosnian village where S lived her immediate reaction is not of panic She is mildly

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Tessa Young is an 18 year old college student with a simple life, excellent grades, and a sweet boyfriend She always has things planned out ahead of time, until she meets a rude boy named Harry, with too many tattoos and piercings who shatters her plans.