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Respectable ( epub ) ✓ Lynsey Hanley


SUMMARY Respectable

Respectable

The world to another a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process of uprooting which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get on In this empathic wry and passionate exploration of class in Britain today Lynsey Hanley looks at how people are kept apart and keep themselves apart and the costs involved in the journey from 'there' to 'here' SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought provoking a great read I could not put it down The Doctors Dating Bargain psychologically disruptive The Collection process of uprooting which leaves Whispers of Feathers people divided between the Mount série tome 3 - L'empire du mal place they left and the Entrepreneurial Vernacular place they have to inhabit in order to get on In this empathic wry and Advanced C Programming by Example passionate exploration of class in Britain today Lynsey Hanley looks at how Poslije svega (After, people are kept apart and keep themselves apart and the costs involved in the journey from 'there' to 'here' SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought Die Herrenschneiderei provoking a great read I could not Calling Cards: Uncover Your Calling put it down

READ ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ´ Lynsey Hanley

Ave to pay to leave behind her working class world and become middle classClass remains resolutely with us as strongly as it did fifty years ago and with it the idea of aspiration of social mobility which received wisdom tells us is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society as a whole Yet for the many millions who experience it changing class is like emigrating from one side of The premise of this book is a very interesting one and it s very definitely a book that makes you think I m not sure whether it s about class or social mobility I think that both of those topics are big enough for a book of their own I m very glad to have read this it was useful and helpful Having grown up as an expat I m sort of half in half out on the class thing It was though a huge relief to get to the end The book is intelligent and well argued But it goes on and on like a well meaning impassioned relative with one too many chardonays on board at the lunch table Good book some great intelligent argumentsAnd ranty But probably worth it

Lynsey Hanley ´ 9 READ & DOWNLOAD

Society is often talked about as a ladder from which you can climb from bottom to top The walls are less talked about This book is about how people try to get over them whether they manage to or notIn autumn 1992 growing up on a vast Birmingham estate the sixteen year old Lynsey Hanley went to sixth form college She knew that it would change her life but was entirely unprepared for the price she would h I was predisposed to regard Lynsey Hanley s book favourably having very much enjoyed her previous work Estates and finding that we had a similar background albeit separated by a decade or so While Hanley was raised on the Chelmsley Wood council estate in Solihull I was fortunate enough to grow up in the slightly salubrious Shirley my parents were both born into poverty but benefited from postwar employment levels so that by the time I was born my father had been promoted to foreman in the factory where he worked enabling my mother to work only part time and the pair of them to take out a mortgage on a house beyond the boundary of Birmingham itself albeit only barely The similar backgrounds and biographies are germane to my enjoyment of Hanley s book not because they generate a sense of solidarity or recognition or not only because of that but also because they go some way to explaining our mutual interest in sociology and our fascination with the issue of classWhereas Hanley recounts discovering the middle class for the first time at Solihull Sixth Form College my first encounter took place at a younger age 14 when I joined the local tennis club It was there that I first met not just the middle class but also snobbery as well as contempt and disdain both for me and for my people Having been fortuitous and privileged up to that point it was not until my teenage years that I became conscious of not being good enough of being observed from the outside and judged negatively as wanting It was at this point that class became for me a reality a lived experience When I subseuently moved to Manchester and found sociology was an A level subject on the local college curriculum I took to it like a duck to waterIt was sociology that allowed me and Hanley to make sense not just of our place in the world but also of the world itself And this brings me to the most striking revelation I experienced while reading Respectable That those who find themselves growing up in the heart of their class rarely have to give their social location a second thought because everyone surrounding them reaffirms the same set of values they never have cause to doubt nor need to reflect upon the intrinsic merit of their own class habitus they are working class and proud of it or else they are born to rule the creme de la creme as one of my schoolfriends the son of two teachers put it before going off to work for Lehman s and DeutscheBank For other specific class fractions however those on the boundaries between two classes those who have moved between classes up or down class becomes an obsession Indeed it is fair to say that this obsession with class and the concern with self worth are in themselves part of the habitus of these particular class fractions these are the benighted folk who comprise what may be called the anxious classes that part of the middle class worried about falling into poverty those upwardly mobile from the working class concerned about keeping up appearances and those who engage in conspicuous consumption the nouveaux riches keen to demonstrate their social mobility And of course Sociologists It is class as these groups experience it which is to say self consciously that is really at the heart of Hanley s book Not that the book is any the worse for that The arguments and observations are well supported making good use of the canonical texts in the Sociology of Class Paul Willis Wilmott Young Pierre Bourdieu etc But because it uses Hanley s own experiences anecdotally as a way of introducing topics it really only provides a phenomenology of the class migrant s experience of class Those who have spent their entire lives within their own class may have an entirely different view of class than that described hereHanley expresses her admiration for Richard Hoggart s mid 20th century classic The Uses of Literacy and to some extent has succeeded in producing a 21st century version While this is admirable it means the book is accompanied by all the attendant vices of Hoggart s book particularly the tendency to wander off topic for the sake of enumerating or recording particular events Nonetheless I found very little to disagree with and much to like within the confines of the account she provides It would have been interesting to have heard the voices of the people Hanley left behind in her movement between classes Did they all fail to make it into the middle class Are any of them better off financially than she is and if so how come What is their view of class We don t know What Hanley has really given us are the pathologies of a particular way of thinking about class and the reader may conclude that the importance she ascribes to the issue is nothing than the result of her own upbringing I m inclined to agree For a comprehensive measure of the role and importance of class I would suggest the need to add a macroscopic perspective such as that provided by Pickett and Wilkinson s The Spirit Level as well as a historical dimension such as that given in Conor McCabe s The Sins of the Fathers Which is not to say that Hanley s book is not illuminating and a joy to read only that vignettes however beautifully and intelligently drawn are only windows into a life not maps of an entire world

  • Hardcover
  • 240
  • Respectable
  • Lynsey Hanley
  • en
  • 19 July 2017
  • 9781846142062

About the Author: Lynsey Hanley

British writer and journalist born 1976



10 thoughts on “Respectable

  1. says:

    I was predisposed to regard Lynsey Hanley’s book favourably having very much enjoyed her previous work Estates and finding that we

  2. says:

    While reading ‘Respectable’ I couldn’t help contemplating how I would write my own version as I’ve sometimes considered doing Like Hanley I spend uite a lot of time thinking about the British class system and its influence on my childhood and education My background is markedly different to Hanley’s but I have a similar sense of having experienced life in multiple parts of the class hierarchy while feeling slightly set a

  3. says:

    BOTWhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9Description Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decadesChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other where you have to rescind your old passport learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of your old life even if they are the relationsh

  4. says:

    Very readable and therefore I got through it faster than I expected but also I found a lot in common in terms of life experiences background and trajectory so it was gripping and deeply thought provoking I've always had the sense of running away from my upbringing to a better life of my own making and in recent years been aware o

  5. says:

    From BBC radio 4 Book of the WeekJournalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four deca

  6. says:

    The premise of this book is a very interesting one and it's very definitely a book that makes you think I'm not sure whether it's about class or social mobility I think that both of those topics are big enough for a book of their own I'm very glad to have read this it was useful and helpful Having grown up as an expat I'm sort of

  7. says:

    A very readable combination of the author's autobiographical reminiscences of growing up as 'respectable' working

  8. says:

    BBC Radio 4 Book of the Book interesting historical and locality reminiscences well written

  9. says:

    SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought provoking; a great read I could not put it down

  10. says:

    “Our culture contains many silent symbols powerful than money It contains keys that can’t be bought which gain access to rooms whose existence you can barely imagine unless you get to enter them Social and cultural capital works on a compound interest model the you have the you get The knowledge and influence you accru

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