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[Andrew Graham-Dixon] Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane [womens Book] eBook – Epub, Kindle ePUB and TXT



10 thoughts on “Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane

  1. says:

    Wonderful biography Perhaps 'a life history' is a better word as Caravaggio remains an obscure person The only written records available are court records relating to his almost weekly arrests for insult and violent behaviour There a

  2. says:

    A remarkable biography Caravaggio liked to live life in the shadows as reflected in his artwork so the only sources Graham Dixon has to work with for his book are court records from Caravaggio's trouble making and the occasional letter mention

  3. says:

    This is a biography of a gifted artist who unfortunately also possessed a proud and difficult personality that got him into freuent trouble with the law Ironically much of what is known about Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 1571–1610 comes to us from the criminal archives that document his freuent arrests and various depositions in legal interrogations Of course his paintings are also a permanent record of his life's

  4. says:

    This review originally appeared at the Washington Independent Review of BooksBeing a tortured rock star is tough in any century Case in point Michaelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio the brilliant brooding bad boy of the 16th century art world whose rise to fame in his early 20s seemed propelled as much by sheer force of will as it was talent and whose fall before the age of 40 makes for a spectacularly self destruc

  5. says:

    The messy story of what happened to Caravaggio's last paintings is also a microcosm of his afterlife and a parable illustrating his singularity as a painter He had always been an outsider a troublemaker a difficult and dangerous man Yet his art was so compelling so original so unforgettable that people were simply transfixed by i

  6. says:

    A spectacular biography in every way imaginable The author carefully puts together the historical record to provide as complete a picture of a complex troubled genius as is possibleMore importantly Graham Dixon illuminates each of Caravaggio's paintings in such clear historical literary and artistic detail that

  7. says:

    Well written engaging and comprehensive biography of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio the great Italian renaissance painter famous for his dramatic effects of light and shade and intense realism Portrait of Caravaggio by Ottavio LeoniCaravaggio was an intriguing and complex man an impetuous character who kept company with whores and courtesans always ready to engage in a fight or an argument He uickly flared up at th

  8. says:

    I love art history because it seems very interactive to me I often have the painting being discussed pulled up on my phone so while the author describes specific moments and strokes in the painting I can also be studying it in detail When you

  9. says:

    I know it's a cliche but facts about this artist's life are so few and far between he is very much like his own paintings emerging briefly every now and then from the dark out into daylightDetails of his early life are particularly sparse which made to me at least the first hundred or so pages of this biography hard going

  10. says:

    ‘Caravaggio’s art is made from darkness and light’Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio born on 29 September 1571 died on 18 July

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free read Í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB õ Andrew Graham-Dixon

Ose of cardinals and prostitutes prayer and violence Graham Dixon puts the murder of a pimp Ranuccio Tomassoni at the centre of his story It occurred at the height of Caravaggio’s fame in Rome and probably brought about his flight through Malta and Sicily which led to his dea. A spectacular biography in every way imaginable The author carefully puts together the historical record to provide as complete a picture of a complex troubled genius as is possibleMore importantly Graham Dixon illuminates each of Caravaggio s paintings in such clear historical literary and artistic detail that anyone familiar with these paintings will now see them with a depth they have never before experienced I already know that I will come back to it again and again in anticipation of any time I am fortunate enough to view Caravaggio s work in the future In fact as much as I have loved each of Caravaggio s paintings that I have seen in person I now know that I never uite appreciated the beauty and complexity of each The chronology used to describe the paintings the stories behind each work now put each into a context I had never before understood I can t wait to rediscover Caravaggio s art again after reading this bookGraham Dixon does not cover up any of the gritty or tragic details of Caravaggio s life nor does he resort to tabloid sensationalism We meet a very human Caravaggio whose brilliance is neither obscured by his troubled life experiences nor elevated to an idealized sainthoodToo often trite jokes are made about the value of art history I ve been guilty myself of the same thing Graham Dixon s work will eliminate any notion of frivolity about the study of art history This is a serious work that will live for the ages It should become a standard for any professional or amateur student of art history Should others follow in the footsteps set by this example humanity will be better servedThis is a book that will remain with me for the rest of my life If you have ever been touched by a work of art you should read Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane Graham Dixon s account will stay with you long after you have finished reading it

read Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane

Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane

Th in suspicious circumstances off the coast of Naples Graham Dixon shows how Caravaggio’s paintings emerged from this extraordinarily wild and troubled life his detailed readings of them explain their originality and Caravaggio’s mentality better than any of his predecesso. Well written engaging and comprehensive biography of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio the great Italian renaissance painter famous for his dramatic effects of light and shade and intense realism Portrait of Caravaggio by Ottavio LeoniCaravaggio was an intriguing and complex man an impetuous character who kept company with whores and courtesans always ready to engage in a fight or an argument He uickly flared up at the merest hint of an insult and conseuently was fast to draw a blade He was an aggressive man determined to take revenge on his adversaries whatever the cost A talented artist Caravaggio was unafraid to break the mold making his own way in the Roman crowded painters market He rejected the fashion of his era for classical idealized forms by employing an immediately recognizable lightening strike style of painting a powerful contrast of light and dark and using subtle and complex symbolism in his works The Crucifixion of St Peter 1600 1601 Doubting Thomas c 1603 Sacrifice of Isaac 1603 St Jerome Writing c 1605Graham Dixon does an amazing job at Caravaggio s biography and career that spanned the decades immediately before and after the year 1600 The author closely follows the artist s steps through his turbulent life from his humble beginnings in Lombardy to the start of his successful career in Rome After having murdered a rival in 1606 Caravaggio is exiled from the capital and takes refuge in Naples where he establishes his fame as a talented and sought after painter Unable to return to Rome Caravaggio leaves for Malta where he becomes a knight of the Order of St John in return for artworks commissioned by the Grand Master but almost as soon as he is knighted he manages to find trouble again and lands in jail After escaping from prison he flees to Sicily where he works while on the run Leaving a brothel in Naples he is attacked and seriously injured Eventually he arranges a pardon for his murder but he dies at Porto Ercole on his way back to Rome The Entombment detail 1602 03 St John the Baptist detail c 1604 Death of the virgin detail 1605 Judith beheading Holofernes detail c 1597Graham Dixon vividly recreates the atmosphere of the period and the historical setting of each city where Caravaggio lived and immersing the reader in the local way of life He provides well researched historical and social background as well as art criticism of Counter Reformation Italian art with some insightful and interesting interpretations of Caravaggio s most famous works The inclusion of translations of the original reports and witness statements in the archives of Roman courts on the many incidents involving Caravaggio was very interesting they provide an illuminating perspective on Roman society as well as the painter s personalityThe book includes a map of Italy c 1610 and detailed period maps of the cities where the artist was active Milan Rome Naples and Valletta The reader will also find a good number of illustrations of referred to artworks author s notes and bibliography for further research although sadly a timeline of the artist s life and major works is missing An excellent read for me I would highly recommended this book to people who enjoy artists biographies and Renaissance art lovers 5 stars for the book 25 for the narration About the audio versionview spoiler It s a pity that Audible didn t bother to find someone who can narrate in good Italian it may be excused in a book with a few Latin phrases and Italian terms here and there but in a book set in Italy and about Italian art and history like this one it s disappointingI doubt that Ballerini speaks fluent Italian His pronunciation of places and famous historical characters puts strong emphasis on their names he vacillates between sounds for double and single consonants eg ss nn tt in Giorgio Vasari Mario Minniti Francesco Susinno Buonarroti and uses the wrong stress on words altogether eg in pazzia the accent is on the i not on the first a in Girolamo is on the first o not on the a in Apostoli on the a not the second o etc these are typical anglophone mistakes His narration became distracting tedious and even cringe worthy at times hide spoiler

free read Í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB õ Andrew Graham-Dixon

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 29 September 1571–18 July 1610 lived probably the darkest and most dangerous life of any of the great painters The worlds of Milan and Rome through which Caravaggio moved and which Andrew Graham Dixon describes brilliantly in this book are th. This is a biography of a gifted artist who unfortunately also possessed a proud and difficult personality that got him into freuent trouble with the law Ironically much of what is known about Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 1571 1610 comes to us from the criminal archives that document his freuent arrests and various depositions in legal interrogations Of course his paintings are also a permanent record of his life s work as is also the milieux both churchy and raunchy within which he lived that offers a fairly complete biography of the sort of life he livedHis early career was influenced by the resurgent Counter Reformation Catholic church that sought a style of art to counter the threat of Protestantism Caravaggio is generally credited with being part of the early Baroue movement Caravaggio s innovation was a radical naturalism that combined close physical observation with a dramatic even theatrical use of chiaroscuro which came to be known as tenebrism the shift from light to dark with little intermediate valueThe author pieces together circumstantial evidence to suggest that Caravaggio may have had a second avocation of pimping If so it helps to explain why he repeatedly is apprehended in the middle of the night prowling the streets curfew violation and armed with sword and dagger unlawful without a license I was interested to learn that Orazio Gentileschi was an acuaintance of Caravaggio s I ve listened to the book The Passion of Artemisia which is a historical novel about Artemisia Gentileschi the daughter of Orazio Caravaggio was NOT involved in the notorious trial regarding the rape of Artemisia however an excerpt from the trial records is included in this book in order to provide background information and an example of the dangers found in Rome in those daysThe artist community in the city of Rome of that era was filled with rivalries and jealousies that tended to lead to situations of slander and insult In retrospect it s almost predictable that an environment such as this would lead to homicide and indeed it did Caravaggio killed a man and fled the city to escape prosecution The story at the time was that it resulted from an argument about a tennis game The author sites evidence which indicates that it was actually a duel with swords involving two combatants two seconds who became involved in the fighting and four witnesses two on each side The cover story of a tennis game was used to avoid the laws against duelingAs an exile from Rome Caravaggio traveled to Naples and then Malta He was imprisoned in Malta for rowdy behavior and made a miraculous escape the details of which are unknown He escaped as a fugitive back to Sicily and then back to Naples where a gang probably sent from Malta attacked him held in down and carved cuts on his face to create scars In the author s opinion this cutting of the face was intended as payback for an insult given by Caravaggio to somebody from Malta The author who seems uite sure of himself provides the name of the person who had Caravaggio tracked downCaravaggio painted two paintings after being attacked and they show signs of being physically compromised the brushwork is so broad the definition of forms so unsure that the painter seems to have fallen prey to some form of essential tremor an uncontrollable shaking of the hands as well as perhaps to damage of the eyesCaravaggio s reputation as an accomplished painter enabled him to win prestigious and well paid commissions at all the places he visited after fleeing Malta even though he was a fugitive and probably knew that he was being tracked by Maltese agentsHe died reportedly due to a fever in 1610 during a trip back to Rome where he expected to receive a pardon arranged by powerful Roman friends It was from this later part of his life that he reportedly refused holy water at a church on the grounds that it was only good for washing away venial sins Mine are all mortal were Caravaggio s words hardly those of a man untroubled by uestions of salvation or damnationThis book was published too early to include information about the recent findings of an excavated grave in Italy that is likely to be that of Caravaggio s Bones in the grave contained high lead levels which is probably related to the paints used at the time which contained high amounts of lead salts Thus it is likely that some of Caravaggio s violent behavior was caused by lead poisoningThis is a big book 514 pages including Notes Further Reading and Index that thoroughly covers the subject Insightful commentary is provided in the book for almost all of the surviving works of Caravaggio I believe these descriptions would be constructive reading for anyone who anticipates visiting a museum where the paintings are on display The rest of this review is focused on specific paintings by Caravaggio that I found to be of special interestOne reason for my interest in this book is the fact that the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art located in Kansas City near where I live contains within its collection the painting St John the Baptist by Caravaggio St John the Baptist by Caravaggio Nelson Atkins Museum of ArtThe following excerpt is what this book had to say about the above painting I have included it here so I can review it prior to my next visit to the museumIt was probably in the summer of 1604 between fights that Caravaggio painted the hauntingly intense St John the Baptist now in the Nelson Atkins Museum of Kansas City The picture was almost certainly painted for the Genoese banker Ottavio Costa There is an early copy in the church of the Oratory of the Confraternity of Conscente in Liguria which was a fief of the Costa dynasty The family had paid for the building of the church so it may be that Caravaggio s painting was originally destined for its high altar and subseuently replaced by the copy for reasons unknown Perhaps Ottavio Costa was so impressed by the work when he saw it that he decided to keep it for his art collection in RomeThe picture is very different to the St John the Baptist painted for Ciriaco Mattei a couple of years before As in the earlier painting the saint occupies an unusually lush desert wilderness Dock leaves grow in profusion at his feet But he is no longer an ecstatic laughing boy He has become a melancholy adolescent glowering in his solitude Clothed in animal furs and swathed in folds of blood red drapery he clutches a simple reed cross for solace as he broods on the errors and miseries of mankind The chiaroscuro is eerily extreme there is a pale cast to the light which is possibly intended to evoke moonbeams but the contrasts are so strong and the shadows so deep that the boy looks as though lit by a flash of lightning This dark but glowing painting is one of Caravaggio s most spectacular creations It is also a reticent and introverted work a vision of a saint who looks away to one side rather than meeting the beholder s eye This second St John is moodily withdrawn lost in his own world despising thoughts The picture might almost be a portrait of Caravaggio s own dark state of mind his gloomy hostility and growing sense of isolation during this period of his life pg 277 278The following excerpt from the book tells of one occasion when Caravaggio s work was rejected because it portrayed St Matthew with too much appearance of a poor peasant instead of an important saint of the church I happen to be sympathetic with Caravaggio s preference to show the followers of Jesus as being plain and poor folk Despite or likely because of its brusue singularity Caravaggio s picture pleased nobody according to Baglione The St Matthew was rejected as soon as it was delivered Bellori gave the fullest account of events Here something happened that greatly upset Caravaggio with respect to his reputation After he had finished the central picture of St Matthew and installed it on the altar the priests took it down saying that the figure with its legs grossed and its feet rudely exposed to the public had neither decorum nor the appearance of a saint That was of course precisely Caravaggio s point Christ and his followers looked a lot like beggars than cardinals But the decision of Mathieu Cointrel s executors was final Saving Caravaggio s blushes Vincenzo Giustiniani took the painting of St Matthew for his own collection Giustiniani also prevailed on the congregation of San Luigi dei Francesi to allow the painter to try againThe resulting picture his second version of St Matthew and the Angel was accepted without demur The character of the painting and indeed the very fact that it was commissioned at all suggests that those in charge of the commission had few doubts about the painter s ability As far as they were concerned it was merely his taste and the tenor of his piety that was suspect if he was given the right instruction these could easily be amended pg 236 237Here s the first version of St Matthew and the Angel Here s the second version of St Matthew and the Angel Caravaggio had some additional paintings rejected because of their realism In one case Mary is shown with cleavage and in another painting titled Death of the Virgin she is shown too dead An ascension scene was preferred

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