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[Summary] American Nations ↠ Colin Woodard



10 thoughts on “American Nations

  1. says:

    Growing up in the South I always wondered why my family was so different from those around us We were friendly with the people in our community but when serious discussions came up my parents grew uiet Our friends and neighbors had no such reservations They were opinionated and always eager for a fight of any kind whether with fis

  2. says:

    The good first I buy the premise of this book that the US is made up of rival nations with borders vastly different from the regions depicted on common maps of the country And I enjoyed the parts that seek to illustrate the founding and spreading of US colonies and what later became US territory When Woodard tries to characterize the people of the land however he brushes with broad unflattering strokes that I found ha

  3. says:

    It was good but particularly toward the end became the author's opinion rather than statistical evidence or other facts He is from Maine and allowed his predjudices to show According to him all Southerners comprised of Tidewater Deep South and Appalachia are Republicans conservative racist backward and so on with the usua

  4. says:

    Jon Stewart can’t do it all alone The Daily Show has evolved toward open minded consideration of the issues of the day and less outright comedy because Stewart still thinks honest people of good faith can cut through the nonsense and figure out problems in a way any reasonable person can admit makes sense Colin Woodard’s Americ

  5. says:

    Journalist and amateur historian Colin Woodard makes a lot of interesting assertions on the back of thin evidence Splitting North America into eleven competing “nations” or accurately cultural archetypes Woodard goes to great lengths to explain the history of the United States not as a single hegemonic unit but as many smaller competing units within a federal framework Woodard himself explains his work as a synthe

  6. says:

    I don't care how much American history you know or think you know this book awkwardly sub titled “A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures” is a revelation I'll give you an example of my own where is the oldest building made by Europeans in the US If you grew up in the Northeast you're probably thinking it’s in Boston or Philadelphia Went to school in the Southeast maybe it’s in St Augustine or

  7. says:

    I am very enthusiastic about this 2011 book and would recommend it heartily even to people who might not themselves be inclined to give it five stars Colin Woodard assigns all of North America to one of eleven regions as op

  8. says:

    I give this book 4 stars because his underlying observation is so cogent so obvious and so explanatory Just wonderful Anybody who sees and de

  9. says:

    Recommended with reservations; the first half of the book covering the historical origins of the 11 diverse nations that comprise modern United States is brilliant For instance most people don't realize that the vibrant multicultural entity that is New York was just like that continuously all the way back to its founding as New Amsterdam which was the most diverse and progressive city of its time Or that Deep South was founded by Barbados

  10. says:

    My problem with broad stroke history books is that they are far too broad and that you cannot really make claims or assertions because there simply isn’t enough evidence provided to back them up Ultimately this is the greatest weakness of Woodard’s book It’s a very interesting premise and one that I largel

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Read Í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Colin Woodard

Distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territoryIn American Nations Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations which conform to neither state nor international boundaries He illustrates and explains why American values vary sharply from one region to another Woodar Journalist and amateur historian Colin Woodard makes a lot of interesting assertions on the back of thin evidence Splitting North America into eleven competing nations or accurately cultural archetypes Woodard goes to great lengths to explain the history of the United States not as a single hegemonic unit but as many smaller competing units within a federal framework Woodard himself explains his work as a synthesis and looking through the footnotes of American Nations one wonders at the paucity of original sources or at the scarcity of secondary sources Woodard puts forth broad claims about the American history or regional characteristics on the strength of few sources to wit McCullough s John Adams as the primary resource on the Adams presidency In all Woodard s view of his pet regions remains terribly surface Though his argument is engagingly presented Woodard s pessimistic impression not only about the current state of inter regional solidarity but about the entire history of inter regional solidarity lends itself to Woodard s worldview and worse his surface only approach to North American history The primary drive behind the book emerges in the final two chapters where Woodard engages in straight faced left wing sloganeering engineering the villainy of the Deep South against the social progressive good guys in so called Yankeedom Despite the shifting regional alliances from colonization to today mapped throughout the book Woodard insists that the primary cultural movers retain the traditional North South focus despite his earlier explanation that such a cultural axis possessed complexity than he later shows In Woodard s estimation all other regional groups are basically vassal states one way or another to this cultural axisIn the end Woodard s view of regionalism complete with names too cutesy to take seriously presents interesting ideas and a new way of interpreting old history but cannot carry the freight necessary to make a compelling argument from the sources When Woodard begins to fantasize about a United States without the former Confederacy as a socialist paradise like Canada or Europe he loses the thread of his own argument entirely and drifts into irrelevance Woodard ought to try his hand at Alternate History and leave this rank fantasy behind

Read American Nations

American Nations

D reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the blue countyred county maps of recent presidential elections American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future Recommended with reservations the first half of the book covering the historical origins of the 11 diverse nations that comprise modern United States is brilliant For instance most people don t realize that the vibrant multicultural entity that is New York was just like that continuously all the way back to its founding as New Amsterdam which was the most diverse and progressive city of its time Or that Deep South was founded by Barbados plantators unlike the Tidewater area of Virginia and Maryland founded by recently transpanted gentry from England with conseuent differences in culture and policy Etc etc The second half of the book however is devoted to exposing the author s deeply partisan interpretation of the recent US history which is so biased that it makes one uestion the veracity of every historical fact listed in support of the author s viewpoint

Read Í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Colin Woodard

An illuminating history of North America's eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state blue state myth North America was settled by people with distinct religious political and ethnographic characteristics creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since Subseuent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an American or Canadian culture but rather into one of the eleven The good first I buy the premise of this book that the US is made up of rival nations with borders vastly different from the regions depicted on common maps of the country And I enjoyed the parts that seek to illustrate the founding and spreading of US colonies and what later became US territory When Woodard tries to characterize the people of the land however he brushes with broad unflattering strokes that I found hard to take seriously His discussion concerns missionaries slave lords congressmen etc yet he casually refers to Midlanders or Yankees as though he has provided any insight whatsoever to the women minority residents or political moderates of that region Woodard s personal prejudices are made most evident by the facts and events he chooses to discuss and the ones he ignores He laments the railway land grants in the Far West but handily excludes of any thoughtful consideration of New NetherlandsYankee ownership of these railroad companies He obviously lambasts the Deep South for its commitment to slavery but obscures New England s history of violent relations with Native Americans Other events are presented in contentious and sometimes bizarre ways Reconstruction in the South for example is described as a benevolent peaceful outpouring of New English charityI expected from this book a thoughtful consideration of the areas that don t uite fit the regions we ve often assigned them to Woodard s El Norte Tidewater and parts of Appalachia for example And the book s discussion of these areas is rewarding at times But in the long run his re drawing of the US map is just a ualification for his broad stroke stereotyping of the people in those regions What could have been a good synthesis of the acuisition and founding of US territory devolves into something flat and unconvincing often annoyingThe writing is accessible but lazy with inconsistent parentheses recycled chapter openings and formulaic sentence structures There are un cited uotes and phrases put in gimmicky uotations for no apparent reason other than that the author doesn t want to take responsibility for them Two stars is generous but it s a cool map

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Tessa Young is an 18 year old college student with a simple life, excellent grades, and a sweet boyfriend She always has things planned out ahead of time, until she meets a rude boy named Harry, with too many tattoos and piercings who shatters her plans.